Individual Notes

Note for:   Jennett Ann Ronson,   17 Mar 1843 - 12 Dec 1897         Index

Death Note: Source:    Her son in law, Burdetto Blystone, also died of the same thing 4 days later.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Eleanor Jane Ronson,   ABT 1849 -          Index

Birth Note: Source:    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church.
Search performed using PAF Insight on 21 Mar 2005



Individual Notes

Note for:   , Blystone,   25 Dec 1895 - 25 Dec 1895         Index

Individual Note:
     Born a twin. Both were girls.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Ellen Ferris,   ABT 1848 -          Index

Birth Note: Source:    Age 23 on the 1871 Census



Individual Notes

Note for:   Anders Andersson Borg,   17 Aug 1829 - 8 Aug 1905         Index

Individual Note:
     COMMAND: 07 July 2005 The last name was changed to Borg after the family farm in Finland when they came over to America in 1882. They were Swedish folks living in Finland.
21 July 2006 It is possible that they came over at differ times. On the only censue for the father, Andrew, it was stated that he came in 1872. The rest, 1881, 1882, & 1885.

Individual Note:
     Taken from the family photo.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Anders Johansson,   18 Nov 1789 -          Index

Christening:   
     Date:   20 Nov 1789
     Place:   Karleby, Vaasa, Finland


Individual Notes

Note for:   Jacob Johansson,   19 May 1788 -          Index

Christening:   
     Date:   20 May 1788
     Place:   Karleby, Vaasa, Finland


Individual Notes

Note for:   William Healy,   1613 - 28 Nov 1683         Index

Christening:   
     Date:   18 Aug 1613
     Place:   Bottesford, Lincolnshire, England

Individual Note:
     BIOGRAPHY: Summary of William Healy of New England and evidence that he was William Healey of Burringham is summarized as follows:
1. The names of the two individuals are identical, - William Healey and William Healy, - the surname of the latter appearing in the records often spelled Healey.
2. The birth date of William Healey of Burringham appears to be identical with the birth date of William Healy, which we know to be 1613.
3. William Healey of Burringham was a younger son, without prospect of inheritance, and therefore ripe for opportunity to better his fortune in the new world.
4. The opportunity was at hand in the Puritan emigration of the decade 1630-1640, heavily recruited from his home vicinity u under local Lincolnshire leaders, and made particularly available by the encouragement given to emigrants by the merchants of the nearby city of old Boston.
5. At this time, about 1636, the young William Healy appears in the Massachusetts Bay Colony at Lynn, and as a member of the church of Lynn, - a community founded by and under the
leadership of Rev. Samuel Whiting, of Boston in Lincolnshire.
6. William Healey of Burringham is not accounted for in family records of later years, whereas all three of his brothers are carried on in the family pedigree.
7. William Healy of New England appears to have been known to have been of gentility, in that he was accepted by families of high standing, though not overly successful in his own right.
8. His benefactress, the widow Elizabeth Merrick, who bequeathed money to him, and who took a special interst in his children, was from Lincolnshire.
9. William Healy's first close association in New England, and his first marriage, was with the Suffolk family of Ives; two of the brothers of William Healey of Burringham had made marriages with a Suffolk gentry family.
10.The whole later career of William Healy in the colony tends to indicate that he might well have been the restless son of a good family, never very fortunate, and not able to merge too successfully into the surroundings in which he found himself in the new world.
        This circumstantial evidence as to the origin of William Healy of New England makes an interesting and convincing case, and if the conclusion reached is correct, four generations of family lineage are added to the nimber recorded in America. If it is true that he was William Healey of Burringham, the line of descent goes back unbroken to the early years of the sixteenth century and the days of Henry VIII.

BIOGRAPHY: William Healy married for the fourth time on 15 August 1661. This marriage was to Phebe Green, daughter of Bartholomew Green and his wife Elizabeth. It is from this marriage that the descents of the Nova Scotia and Ontario Haley families are traced. Bartholomew Green had come to New England in 1634 with his wife, his sons Samuel and Nathaniel, and his daughters Sarah and Phebe. He had died within a year after his coming. About 1646 the daughter Sarah had married Thomas Longhorne, who was a butcher and also the Cambridge town drummer. The widow Elizaabeth Green and her unmarried daughter Phebe were long members of the Cambridge church, as was William Healy. At the time of his marriage he was forty-eight years of age, and Phebe Green was approaching forty. In the next few years William Healy continued with his business, which required several servants and apprentices. William Healy was one of the signers of a petition addressed to the General Court, expressing loyalty to his majesty the King, and satisfaction with the present government, provided the chartered rights of the Colony were not interfered with. Three children were born to Phebe Green during this period. The first was a son, Samuel, second of William Healy's children to bear the name. He was baptized in Cambridge church 21 September 1662. Another son Paul, ancestor of the Nova Scotia and Ontario families, was baptized 3 April 1664. A daughter, Mary, second of the name, was baptized on 29 October 1665. About this time began an interlude of six distress ridden years. The story can be read in the Middlesex County Court records, where the testimony of parties and witnesses is set down with the utmost Elizabethan frankness. Phebe Green seems to have suffered severe burns, leaving her face badly scarred and causing blindness in one of her eyes. She seems not to have recovered from the shock, and to have verged on being a psychopathic case. She began to complain of abuse by her husband, and of domineering by her husband's daughters, and seems to have given way to melancholia. Her aged mother, distressed by the situation, and believing her story, prevailed upon her son, Phebe's brother Samuel Green, with her son-in-law, Thomas Longhorne, to bring action against William Healy for abuse of his wife. The parties were examined and testimony of witnesses was taken before the Middlesex Court 30 July 1666. The case was set for hearing 2 October 1666, at which time additional affidavits of witnesses were presented, and the answer of William Healy was made. The witnesses against him were, in particular, two of his servants, Samuel Reynolds and Daniel Beckley, and they told a most lurid story, William Healy, in defense, showed that they were prejudiced against him, in that Samuel Reynolds was a loose and scandalous person to whom he had denied his daughter Elizabeth's hand in marriage, and that Daniel Beckley was a refractory servant, "seeking occasion to recompense his Master for his correcting him for his miscarriages." Some testimony was given in William Healy's behalf, - that he had been patient to the extreme in the face of shrewish outbursts by his wife. The Court seems to have taken this view of the matter, and the case ended. It must be remembered that mental disturbance was not viewed in those days as it is now, and that restraint and attempted correction were the only courses open to a husband with an afflicted wife. In August 1667, the following year, Samuel Reynolds, the first of the witnesses mentioned above, was shown to be a rascal, when he was arrested and confined for an attempted violent assault upon William Healy, and for misconduct with the second daughter, Elizabeth. After this incident Elizabeth seems to have gone to live with her married sister Hannah at Salisbury, and for a time there appears to have been relative quiet in William Healy's home. In 1672 William Healy was appointed Prison Keeper of Cambridge. On an ill-starred day in October, 1682, a damsel named Deborah Cane, aged 28, venturing into the prison and up the stairs unannounced, claimed that she detected William Healy in compromising circumstances with one Mary Lovell, a strumpet who had been confined in his custody. She, "in great amazement and shame",reported the fact to one Zachery Hicks. A self appointed committee of Hicks, Goldin Moore, and John Gove saw William Healy about the matter, and he "utterly denied ye thing." Some time later he came to Goldin Moore's house, "at their desire", which probably means under compulsion, as John Gove was a constable, and, "after some paines wer tooke wth him hee did Confess yt it was true." From this language it may be surmised that the meeting was of the nature of what in modern times is called the third degree. The shock and the disgrace seem to have been more than the aged man could endure, for he went into a collapse from which he never recovered. In any event, he was removed from his office, was sentenced to be severely whipped, and was imprisoned. He died in prison on 28 November 1683.